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Alice Palmer

 

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Obama's Political Mentor

In 1995, Alice Palmer represented the state's 13th District, and decided to run for the United States Congress.  She hand-picked Barack Obama to run to replace her.

Palmer introduced her chosen successor to a few of the district's influential liberals at the home of two well-known figures on the local left: William Ayers and Bernardine Dohrn, former members of the terrorist Weather Underground.

"I remember being one of a small group of people who came to Bill Ayers' house to learn that Alice Palmer was stepping down from the Senate and running for Congress," says Quentin Young, a prominent Chicago physician and advocate for single-payer health care. "(Palmer) identified (Obama) as her successor."

Ten years earlier, Palmer was an executive board member of the U.S. Peace Council, which the FBI identified as a communist front group, an affiliate of the World Peace Council, a Soviet front group.

Palmer participated in the World Peace Council's 1983 Prague Assembly, part of the Soviet launch of the nuclear-freeze movement.  The only thing it would have frozen was the Soviet Union's military superiority.

In June 1986, while editor of the Black Press Review, she wrote an article for the Communist Party USA's newspaper, the People's Daily World, now the People's Weekly World.  It detailed her experience attending the 27th Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union and how impressed she was by the Soviet system.

Palmer gushed at the "Soviet plan to provide people with higher wages and better education" and spoke of the efficiency of the Soviets' most recent five-year plan, attributing its success to "central planning."  She praised their "comprehensive affirmative action program, which they have stuck to religiously -- if I can use the word -- since 1917."

Palmer also marveled that all Russian citizens were guaranteed a job matching their training and skills, free education, affordable housing and free medical care.  Because Soviet school curricula were established at the national level, she said, "there is no second-class 'track' system in the minority-nationality schools as there is in the inferior inner city schools in my hometown, Chicago, and elsewhere in the United States."

Well, Alice lost the congressional race to Jesse Jackson, Jr., and decided that she wanted to hang onto that hard-won state senate seat.  Most of the community leaders tried to persuade Obama to withdraw and wait his turn.  He was a newcomer after all.

Obama said no. He had every right to do so, but he decided to fight her for the nomination instead of stepping aside in deference to her. 

Instead Obama performed his first real act of political jujitsu.  He sent his aides to the courthouse to carefully examine all of Alice Palmer's signatures to see if enough could be disallowed to knock her off the ballot altogether.  And indeed, some of Alice's signatures were fake.  The aides also found enough other fake signatures on opponents' ballot initiatives to knock them off the ballot as well.

"They began the tedious process of challenging hundreds of signatures on the nominating petitions of state Sen. Alice Palmer, the longtime progressive activist from the city's South Side. And they kept challenging petitions until every one of Obama's four Democratic primary rivals was forced off the ballot."

Obama ran unopposed in the primary.

By the time Barack Obama walked handily into his state senate seat, everyone there knew him as "the man who knocked off Alice Palmer."  Quite a feat indeed for the newcomer, the young whippersnapper with the odd name.
Was Obama's Political Mentor A Soviet "Agent Of Influence"
New Zeal blog draws our attention to Alice Palmer, a Chicago based academic, activist and former friend, employer and political ally of Barack Obama.

In the mid 1990s Alice Palmer, then an Illinois State Senator, employed Obama has her chief of staff, when she attempted an ill-fated run for the US Congress.

Obama was part of Friends of Alice Palmer, alongside controversial property developer Tony Rezko and Democratic Socialists of America members Danny Davis, Betty Wilhoitte and Timuel Black-also a member of Committees of Correspondence).

Later Palmer introduced Obama as designated successor to her Illinois State Senate seat, in the living room of former Weather Underground terrorists Bill Ayers and Bernardine Dohrn, while DSA member, former communist and long time Obama friend Quentin Young looked on.

The Palmer/Obama relationship soured after Obama refused to step down when Palmer decided she wanted her State Senate seat back, after her Congressional bid failed.

Obama went on to win the seat unopposed, after he knocked Palmer and his other rivals off the ballot, by challenging the legitimacy of their nominating signatures.

Alice Palmer was the first rung of Obama's ladder to power.

It has long been known that Alice Palmer was a communist front activist, as were many in Obama's orbit.

More seriously however-new evidence shows that Alice Palmer had high level connections behind the "Iron Curtain" and may have been a Soviet "agent of influence" -- that is, a conduit of Soviet propaganda and policy, to the US and the "third world".

What is the evidence?

Continue reading here . . .
Friends Of Alice Palmer
 

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Why Obama's Political Mentor Deserted Him
Jerome Corsi says Alice Palmer, the avowed communist who helped launch Barack Obamaís career, continues to haunt Obama even today.

In 2008, Palmer showed up at the Democratic National Convention in Denver as a Hillary Clinton supporter, still resentful toward Obama for knocking her and three other candidates off the ballot for an Illinois state Senate seat some 13 years earlier by challenging voter signatures.

"The Democratic primary, what I witnessed, was one of the most appalling, disgusting things Iíve ever seen in my entire life," Hollywood-based digital photographer Michele Thomas told WND in a joint interview with Hollywood film producer Bettina Viviano.

Thomas began as a volunteer for the 2008 Clinton campaign then launched a petition drive when she learned the Democratic National Committee was not going to allow delegates to cast their votes for Clinton at the convention.

"I just felt like the entire process was being eviscerated and rules were being changed all along to ensure that no matter what, Barack Obama was the nominee," Thomas said.

"And I felt compelled to take a stand to have the process in which we decide who our candidates are that we vote for be upheld," she said. "And that the peoplesí votes are held up from the ballot box to the convention where the delegates bring those votes forward."

Thomas said she received death threats as she gathered the 300 signed and notarized petitions required by Democratic National Convention rules to prompt a count of votes for Hillary Clinton on the first ballot.

Knowing how Obama had defeated Palmer in his first election campaign in 1996, Thomas required the delegates who signed the petition to notarize their signatures on two copies. One copy was sent to a Post Office box and the other brought to the convention in Denver.

Thomas said she did it "so there was no way the DNC or the Obama campaign, his lawyers, could knock my signatures off this petition."

Thomas took three months off work to conduct the petition drive, foregoing considerable income.

She explained why she did it and why she is speaking out about it now.

"Iím a little scared right now, thereís no doubt about it," she admitted, "but at some point in your life, if you are fortunate enough, you are faced with the decision of doing something bigger than yourself."

The charges of Thomas, Viviano and others connected to the 2008 campaign are now being investigated by Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaioís Cold Case Posse, which is probing Obamaís eligibility for Arizonaís 2012 ballot.

In 1995, Obama saw his opening to run for elected office when Palmer decided to give up her state Senate seat and run for Congress in a special election.

In 1986, as editor of the Black Press Review, Palmer was the only African-American to cover the 27th Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union in Moscow.

She went out of her way to make Obama her handpicked successor.

To get Obamaís state Senate race off to a good start, Palmer arranged a function to be held for a few influential liberals in the district at the Hyde Park home of Weather Underground founders Bill Ayers and Bernardine Dohrn.

Itís not likely Palmer would have selected Obama to be her successor in the Illinois Legislature or have introduced him to the Hyde Park political community at the Ayers-Dohrn home unless she saw an affinity between Ayers and Dorhnís radical SDS Weather Underground history, her own history of openly professed communism and Obama.

After Palmer stepped aside for Obama to take her seat, she suffered an unexpected electoral defeat in the November 1995 Democratic Party primary. She came in a distant third, behind Jesse Jackson and Emil Jones Jr., a power-wielder who would become Obamaís mentor after Obama was elected to fill Palmerís seat.

After losing the special congressional election, Palmer reversed her decision and decided she wanted her Illinois Senate seat back.

Palmer supporters asked Obama to step aside, but he refused and decided to challenge Palmerís eligibility for the ballot using what the Chicago Tribune described as the "bare-knuckle arts of Chicago electoral politics."

Obama hired a fellow Harvard Law School alumnus to challenge the legitimacy of the signatures Palmer received on petitions to qualify for the ballot.

Once he set on the strategy, Obama kept challenging petitions, until he succeeded in getting all four of his Democratic primary rivals forced off the ballot, enabling him to run unchallenged.

Viviano described Obamaís strategy in defeating Palmer in 1995 as a betrayal.

"Alice Palmer was his mentor who had asked Bill Ayers to throw that coming-out party for Obama," she explained.

Thomas said she met Palmer in person at the 2008 convention in Denver.

"I actually had my petitions in my backpack," Thomas remembered. "I walked right up to her and I said, ĎAlice Palmer, you have no idea how you have affected my life and what Iíve just done.í"

Thomas explained to Palmer how she designed her petition to make sure Obama could not get lawyers to disqualify her signatures.

"I had every single one of these petitions notarized because I know what happened to you," Thomas told Palmer upon meeting her in Denver. "I have them in my backpack right now. Do you want to see them?"

Palmer said yes.

"She started going through them, and she got tears in her eyes when she saw that they were notarized," Thomas recalled. "She said, ĎOh my God, This is what I should have done, this is what I should have done."

Thomas told Palmer that the only reason she got her signatures individually notarized was to prevent the Democratic National Committee or the Obama campaign from throwing out her signatures to disqualify the petition.

"This was all because of what [Obama] did to all of his challengers," Viviano stressed. "It just was outrageous to disqualify these people that way. This is how moral and ethical our so-called president is. His own mentor, who went out of her way to support him in his career -- he turned around with a knife and put it in her back and had her challenged off the ballot in a way that was so amoral and unethical, and she became a Hillary supporter."

Thomas remembered that Palmer pulled her aside at the Denver presidential nominating convention and told Thomas that she wanted to tell her a story.

Palmer explained to Thomas that after Obamaís lawyers disqualified her signatures in 1996, she spent the next few months walking door-to-door making sure her signatures were valid.

"She said every single one of them was correct, and they should have not been knocked off," Thomas said.

Thomas recalled that Palmer wanted to have dinner with her that night. But the person who introduced her to Palmer later called and said that the dinner was off because Palmer had been threatened.

Viviano shared Thomasí outrage.

"America doesnít do scared like that," she insisted. "This is a First Amendment country, freedom of speech and now, all of a sudden, there are people cowering in the corner that are afraid to tell the truth about things.

"This is like living under Chavez or Castro," she said. "Itís ridiculous."
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